The Science of Getting Old

The Science of Getting Old

It’s a fact: Nobody lives forever. Aging is unavoidable. But what actually happens when you age? Why does your hair go grey? Why does your skin wrinkle? www.bestmswprograms.com/ has created an infographic entitled “The Science of Getting Old”, which details the reasons behind the most common signs of aging.
As we age, our bodies start slowing down the regeneration process. Simply, our bodies wear out. If you’re over 20 years old, it’s likely that you’re already feeling the effects – or seeing the effects – of aging.
Our bodies are incredible things. From our hearts beating to our eyes blinking, our bodies are constantly in motion. Unfortunately, this takes a toll, which leads to aging. Getting old starts at a cellular level. Our cells eventually lose the ability to repair and replicate themselves. This process, known as senescence, is believed to be an unavoidable step in cell life. Scientists don’t understand why this happens, but they believe that it occurs to prevent the overgrowth of cells in old age – what we know as cancer.
Scientists are beginning to look at telomerase to extend life spans. In the cell-division process, telomeres keep DNA and RNA from becoming damaged.
If you’re in your 30’s, chances are you’re getting grey hair. This is due to the wearing out of melanin in the body.
Your body also starts slowing down its process of creating collagen, which leads to wrinkles. From the time you’re 20, your body creates 1% less collagen every year. In 2007, 174,290 collagen injections were given to those striving to reduce wrinkles. 55% of the population 50+ has osteoporosis or low bone mass.Each hip fracture due to osteoporosis accounts for $40,000 in total medical costs.
Even our eyes start to tire out. The lenses on our eyes thicken, causing poor eyesight. Half of Americans 80 and older have cataracts that detract from their vision.
Feel free to like, comment, and share this infographic from www.bestmswprograms.com entitled “The Science of Getting Old”.

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Posted Sep 17, 2013
 
Views: 327
Tags aging, effects of aging, getting older, most common signs of aging, science of aging, senescence
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