Marathon 2011: New York Winner

Marathon 2011: New York Winner

Two weeks ago, teams of students from the New York area came together for a 24 hour marathon challenge, working through the night to visualize interconnections between sustainability and development. Visualizing.org is proud to announce the winners of the Visualizing Marathon 2011: New York.

Congratulations to Columbia students Aikaterini Petrou, Yu Tsuji, Mengyi Fan, Marc Moukarzel and Jared Culp for their winning visualization, Urban Leaks. The judges praised the striking design and compelling use of photography to draw the viewer in. The piece also succeeds in focusing on a single critical issue (water consumption) and presenting several data-driven points about it.



An Honorable Mention was given to Columbia students Damon Lau, Cheng Hsin Lee, Kimberly Nguyen and Rebecca Marriott’s project E-Cube-Librium. This ambitious piece presents an original graphic mechanism for comparing a set of indicators. The jury applauded this novel approach to the problem.



Additional congratulations to MICA students Nicolas Kremershof, Luiz Ludwig and David Lam whose visualization Past Progress, Future Forecast? is selected as an Honorable Mention. Their visualization incorporates a wide variety of indicators, and the judges appreciated the attempt to represent such complexity through the metaphor of weather.



Jurors for the competition include Amanda Cox (The New York Times), Camille Kubie (GE), Miguel Luengo-Oroz (UN Global Pulse), Amanda McDonald Crowley (Eyebeam Art + Technology Center) and Maria Popova (Brain Pickings).

Each member of the winning team will receive iPads while Columbia will receive a custom made trophy designed by SJET. And all three visualizations will be entered to win the GE Grand Prize, a $10,000 “Imagination at Work” grant awarded to the winning university to support research, development and/or education that takes the project forward.

A special thanks to all of the Academic Partners, our supporters at UN Global Pulse and our partners at Eyebeam Art + Technology Center for their support and participation. And a HUGE thanks to all of the students for their hard work and stunning visualizations.

See photos and additional information here.

Add a Comment

Login or register to post comments